Phantomwise [Down the Rabbit-Hole]

A blog dedicated to Alice in Wonderland, its many interpretations, and the man who imagined it all (as well as his other works).

For my personal preference, I don't blog the Burton film or 'darker' Alices.
This blog supports the new research by Karoline Leach and Contrariwise.

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News of another rare Australian Alice from 1962! There’s also fortunately a clip of it on Youtube. Thanks so much to Curiouser and Curiouser for finding out about this!

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Image Source: The Canberra Times (December 12, 1962)

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This “special” is the final “B.P. Super Show” for 1962 and will be seen on the four Nines — Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, and Brisbane.

Actor Noel Ferrier, at present Friday night compere of “In Melbourne Tonight” on GTV9, is producing the show in conjunction with regular “Super Show” producer Ian Holmes, who is also directing.

This “Alice” is a new version of the production staged so successfully at the Comedy Theatre, Melbourne, last Christmas by Noel Ferrier, with ballerina Kathleen Gorham as Alice.

It has been specially written for television by scriptwriter Jeff Underhill, and this time Alice is Patricia Moore, petite star of the J.C. Williamson production of the musical “Carnival,” at Her Majesty’s Theatre, Melbourne.

Videotaping the show has made possible special effects that were not available in the theatre.

"Alice, as the central figure, provides the continuity," Jeff said," and the scene changes take place round her in the almost magical way videotape allows."

There will be 14 different scenes in this musical, featuring highlights from both “Alice in Wonderland” and “Alice Through the Looking-Glass.”

"The way the scenes follow one another was simply dictated by a feeling of ‘rightness,’" Jeff said. "It just seemed right, for instance, for the Humpty Dumpty scene to follow the Mad Hatter. There was no particular reason."

Melbourne composer and pianist Bruce George (he and Jeff collaborated on “The Ballad of Angel’s Alley,” seen in Melbourne earlier this year) wrote the music for “Alice” in just a week and found it fascinating to renew acquaintance with the Lewis Carroll verses again for the first time since childhood.

Good music
The eight songs Bruce composed and the music for the ballet are very much in character. For instance, the Lobster Quadrille (you know, the “Will you walk a little faster?” piece), which I saw and heard at rehearsal, is delightful and the big, all-in-together song, “They Told Me,” in the final Court scene is very catchy.

Producer Noel Ferrier plays Humpty Dumpty, as he did in the stage version last year, and comedian Johnny Ladd, just back from England, takes the role of the Queen of Hearts. Bill Hodge is the Duchess, and at rehearsal Bill and Johnny were having a wonderful time with their lines—Johnny with his falsetto “Off with their heads” and Bill with his peppery temper.

The White Knight is played by lanky film star Chips Rafferty, and his song, which has to be sung in a dignified manner befitting the character, is, Bruce George says, his favorite among the songs he has composed for the show. It’s called “A-sitting on a Gate.”

Other parts are the White Rabbit (Brian Crossley), the Mock Turtle and the Caterpillar (Fred Parslow— he sings “Beautiful Soup” and shares with Alice the old favorite “You Are Old, Father Willam”), the March Hare (Ernie Bourne), the Mad Hatter (Bob Hornery), the King of Hearts and the Walrus (Ron Shand), and the Knave of Hearts (Kevin Colson, leading man of “Carnival”).

The television production will use the delightful costumes from last year’s stage version, but the sets are new, designed by Noel Ferrier’s wife, Sue. (“So handy to have a wife who designs sets,” says Noel. “That’s why I married her.”

With very little time on hand, Channel 9’s scenery workshops worked at full pressure under Michael Ivory’s technical supervision. When I saw the scenery, the gay backdrops were finished and there were lots of recognisably “Alice” bits and pieces about—the Mad Hatter’s little cottage, for instance, and the Caterpillar’s mushroom.

The designs are pleasant and fanciful without the rather frightening feeling of the original book illustrations.

The finished production should certainly be different and entertaining to all age groups, with an early evening time-slot making it possible for children to enjoy the fun which, after all, Lewis Carroll originally intended for them.

Image and Information Source: Television Parade (December 19, 1962)

If anyone can track down the full video, it’d be much appreciated!

rustbeltjessie:

From Jabberwocky - poem by Lewis Carroll, illustrated by Joel Stewart. I have a few tattoos from this book: I have a tattoo of the sleepy moon, and of the mome raths (the little accordion and banjo critters). It appears that someone has scanned the whole book and put it up online.

Part of Carrollian Coloring Challenge! Illustration by Lea Kaster

Part of Carrollian Coloring Challenge! Illustration by Lea Kaster

(Source: still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise)

Carroll is coming to terms with some great loss here and one can reasonably assume that it is the loss of his mother, given the specificity of the wording. But what now? Now that his God has taken her from him, Carroll’s views has shifted. Life is no longer about love, or Love. It is a world that is empty and vacant. What was is no more. No matter that outwardly Carroll displayed his devotion to his God, how fair did he believe that God to be, if at all? Besides which, as a true logician, perhaps Carroll knew that life isn’t fair and nobody promised it would be. Death, after all, is a natural part of life. Regardless, his mother was taken too soon, without warning, and at a pivotal time of life. Could this have had some lasting impact on Carroll’s views of love and even of his God? It seems likely, yes. There was a switchover. Carroll never went on to fill Holy Orders for myriad reasons: some have said this is because of his speech hesitation, but to put a finer point on it, it seems that Carroll did not fully accept the Thirty Nine Articles (at one time, Forty Two Articles) of the Anglican church.

Deaths, pain, unfairness often make even the most devout individual question any existence of God. How many times do we hear of a young person dying, or one dying of an illness, and the trite, oft-repeated expression, “It was God’s will.” Rare is the rector who rejects this notion. Not always is it “right” or “out time.” Sometimes, too often, God has nothing to do with the equation, a fact that is hard for some people to accept. The idea that there is a God who is a master puppeteer controlling the strings of our very existence is somehow comforting, even in death. One strives to believe that there must be some purpose. That death may be random is a terrifying thought and concept because it means it could (and does) happen at any time, to anyone, and for no reason. That life is in the here and now and this is it. People die. They die of disease and by chance. They die because they were in the wrong place at the wrong time. And worst of all, people die for no reason. People die and we see just how unfair and random and tentative life truly is.

Carroll got a taste of this at an early age. Love, real Love can be taken away at any time. Just like Stubbs’ “Romancement,” it can vanish overnight or in a matter of moments. Sometimes, our “vision” of love is no more than a mistake. As for Stubbs, he simply failed to see the sign (signs?) as it truly was. Instead, he saw what he wanted to see, not life as it truly is. He projected his own search, his desire, onto something that never was.

It’s a cruel joke that Stubbs’ own eyes deceived him. We learn that even the self is unreliable. We see what we want to see, but this does not mean that it is necessarily reflected back at us, no matter how much we may wish it or will it. We learn then, in short, that even the self is unreliable. We become unreliable narrators of our own lives, and if we can’t trust ourselves with the Truth with a capital T (if one believes in such Platonic ideals and absolutes), then what can we trust ourselves with? We lack control. We lack control over our lives, which can be snatched away; we lack control over the lives of others which can likewise be snatched away at any moment; we lack control over our love, our grief, the feeling in the afterward. So we hang onto “Love while we have it — in some golden daydream — with the understanding, knowledge, that it will undoubtedly fade as summer’s days likewise fade.

Given this, it seems perfectly normal to lose a child’s pure sense of love or Love (there’s that capital letter again), but acquire (even unwillingly) a more cynical view of love. It is Diogenes with his bright lamp, shining light his lamp in corners previously dark and hidden who shows us that life is not all pretty. That there is unfairness. The father of cynicism, he makes of us his followers — fellow cynics.

Ranson-Polizzotti, Sadi. “Love As Nonsense: 42 Seconds of Cynicism.” Contrariwise: the Association for New Lewis Carroll Studies. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 August 2014. <http://contrariwise.wild-reality.net/articles/Love%20As%20Nonsense2.pdf>

spectromagiic:

Disney iPhone 5 BackgroundsAlice in Wonderland (3/4)

Requested by: silverduckie

Please Like/Reblog if you’re going to use any of them!

Message me if you’d like me to do a specific Disney movie next

twinkleandgloom:

Alice in the house.

twinkleandgloom:

Alice in the house.

blackcatcuriosities:

Alice by Yelena Bryksenkova

“‘it was much pleasanter at home,’ thought poor alice, ‘when one wasn’t always growing larger and smaller, and being ordered about by mice and rabbits.’” 
 -Lewis Carroll

blackcatcuriosities:

Alice by Yelena Bryksenkova

“‘it was much pleasanter at home,’ thought poor alice, ‘when one wasn’t always growing larger and smaller, and being ordered about by mice and rabbits.’”

-Lewis Carroll

microfolk:

Pink Eyes by copernicus-fell

microfolk:

Pink Eyes by copernicus-fell

all-in-the-golden-afternoon96:

Lobby cards for the mexican release of Alice’s adventures in Wonderland (1972) from ebay seller featureposters

see link here for listings of all of them:
 http://stores.ebay.co.uk/FEATURE-POSTERS/_i.html?_nkw=Alice+in+Wonderland&submit=Search&_sid=10738121

fuckyeahdisneyfacecharacters:

Alice in Wonderland


Dear Disneyland Paris, please share your Cheshire Cat and March Hare. Sincerely, a cat and hare-less Alice fan

fuckyeahdisneyfacecharacters:

Alice in Wonderland

Dear Disneyland Paris, please share your Cheshire Cat and March Hare. Sincerely, a cat and hare-less Alice fan

all-in-the-golden-afternoon96:

scenes and puppet designs for the 1983 Eva le Gaillenne adaptation of both Alice novels.

Source-  http://www.puppethub.com/photo/photo/listForContributor?screenName=044wnokbyqc6y

karljamesmountford:

Alice in Wonderland and those bitchy flowers.
By Karl James Mountford.
https://www.facebook.com/KarlJamesMountford?fref=photo

karljamesmountford:

Alice in Wonderland and those bitchy flowers.

By Karl James Mountford.

https://www.facebook.com/KarlJamesMountford?fref=photo


Visual Development from Alice in Wonderland by David Hall

Visual Development from Alice in Wonderland by David Hall

(Source: disneyconceptsandstuff)

microfolk:

White Rabbit by copernicus-fell

microfolk:

White Rabbit by copernicus-fell

briannaangelakis:

My debut solo exhibition, Fairy Tales: The Test of Time, is now on view at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco, CA, through June 7th! View the entire show online now here: http://www.moderneden.com/collections/test-of-time

Information regarding my Alice in Wonderland inspired works seen above:

Updates

7/19 Better version of Funky Fables
7/12 Back to Top Added
7/11 New "Inspired By or Referencing" List
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