Phantomwise [Down the Rabbit-Hole]

A blog dedicated to Alice in Wonderland, its many interpretations, and the man who imagined it all (as well as his other works).

For my personal preference, I don't blog the Burton film or 'darker' Alices.
This blog supports the new research by Karoline Leach and Contrariwise.

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all-in-the-golden-afternoon96:


Mad Hatter (Alan Graham), Dormouse (Peter Piccini), March Hare (Peter Harries) and Alice (Pixie Hale) in Alice in Wonderland.
Pixie Hale in a serial production of Alice in Wonderland, on the Channel Niners Club during Christmas 1966 in Western Australia

Just found some info about what appears to be an Australian version shown in 1966. Does anyone know any more about this?

I’ll see what I can dig up

all-in-the-golden-afternoon96:

Mad Hatter (Alan Graham), Dormouse (Peter Piccini), March Hare (Peter Harries) and Alice (Pixie Hale) in Alice in Wonderland.

Pixie Hale in a serial production of Alice in Wonderland, on the Channel Niners Club during Christmas 1966 in Western Australia

Just found some info about what appears to be an Australian version shown in 1966. Does anyone know any more about this?

I’ll see what I can dig up

ohidigress:

Look at the amazing mug I bought.

(Source: still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise)

It would be best, I thought, to introduce [Sylvie and Bruno] as soon as possible to some good-natured lady-guest, and I selected the young lady whose piano-forte-playing had been so much talked of. “I am sure you like children,” I said. “May I introduce two little friends of mine? This is Sylvie—and this is Bruno.”

The young lady kissed Sylvie very graciously. She would have done the same for Bruno, but he hastily drew back out of reach. “Their faces are new to me,” she said. “Where do you come from, my dear?”

I had not anticipated so inconvenient a question; and, fearing that it might embarrass Sylvie, I answered for her. “They come from some distance. They are only here just for this one evening.”

"How far have you come, dear?" the young lady persisted.

Sylvie looked puzzled. “A mile or two, I think" she said doubtfully.

"A mile or three,” said Bruno.

"You shouldn’t say ‘a mile or three,’ ” Sylvie corrected him.

The young lady nodded approval. “Sylvie’s quite right. It isn’t usual to say ‘a mile or three.’ “

"It would be usual—if we said it often enough," said Bruno.

It was the young lady’s turn to look puzzled now. “He’s very quick, for his age!” she murmured. “You’re not more than seven, are you, dear?” she added aloud.

"I’m not so many as that,” said Bruno. “I’m one. Sylvie’s one. Sylvie and me is two. Sylvie taught me to count.”

"Oh, I wasn’t counting you, you know!” the young lady laughingly replied.

"Hasn’t oo learnt to count?” said Bruno.

The young lady bit her lip. “Dear! What embarrassing questions he does ask!” she said in a half-audible ‘aside.’

Lewis Carroll’s Sylvie and Bruno Concluded

Oh, wow. I'm seriously blushing over here. You guys are way too kind. By the way, I don't have a tumblr (can't afford to spend more time on it than I already do). Keep up the great work you guys. (Also, if you could open the Stuff and Nonsense inbox for anons, I'd be most obliged) - Love, Ollie
Anonymous

If you’re already spending time on it, make a tumblr! :P

And sorry about that! I had turned off anons on all my blogs during the spam war and forgot to turn it back on for Stuff and Nonsense. It’s open again

Artist: Stuff and Nonsense
Album: Outtakes
Song: Thanks to Ollie and More Mabel
Plays: 38

stuffandnonsensepodcast:

Outtake thanking Ollie for making the Mabel memes and we giggle a little more about Mabel.

Also, the opening of our tumblr blog!

some language

why does the alice post say 2007 when it came out in 1951? am i missing something or?
Anonymous

Oops, I copied the format from the Unsuk Chin post and apparently forgot to change the year. That’s embarrassing

It’s fixed now

polinakniazeva:

Looking into the garden

polinakniazeva:

Looking into the garden

On This Day in Alice Film/TV History:

July 26, 1951
Walt Disney’s ‘Alice in Wonderland’ premiered in the US. IMDbSee more.

Salmon-River, Dinsdale (Summer 1859)Taken by Charles Dodgson a.k.a. Lewis Carroll
Courtesy of Lewis Carroll, Photographer

Salmon-River, Dinsdale (Summer 1859)
Taken by Charles Dodgson a.k.a. Lewis Carroll

Courtesy of Lewis Carroll, Photographer

(Source: still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise)

dougiecarter:

My mum genuinely thought I was going to tell her off for saying Alice in Wonderland instead of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland but I really don’t care about that at all?? How pretentious does she think I am…?

Hahah, someone would have to be really picky to get mad at that. lol They’d had to get mad at Dodgson too ‘cause he’d shorten the titles to Alice and Looking-Glass.

Lewis Carroll matriculated in May 1850. This meant he lived through some of the most turbulent years in the history of this venerable institution. He also had to endure during the first fifteen years of his tenure the experience of his beloved Anglican Church attempt to tear itself apart. In print, at least, Lewis Carroll was no ‘shrinking violet’. Once he found his feet and established his tenure (from 1855 on, when he became a Master of the House and sub-librarian) he did not hesitate to put into print his thoughts and criticisms of all aspects of Oxford University affairs.

Despite the fact that Carroll’s interventions are very well documented, there remains to this day a great deal of confusion about Carroll’s theological and political development an his particular stance regarding the many controversies the university the university endured, especially during the years prior to publication of the first ‘Alice’ book. A period during which he was both professionally and financially vulnerable.

The enduring idea of Lewis Carroll in the popular imagination, therefore, is that cited by Hudson in his influential ‘Illustrated Biography’:

"W. Tuckwell, an observer from New College, saw the dark side: ‘Austere, shy, precise, absorbed in mathematical reverie, watchfully tenacious of his dignity, stiffly conservative in political, theological, social theory, his life mapped out in squares like Alice’s landscape, he stuck discords in the frank harmonious camaraie of College life,’ (Hudson D. ‘Lewis Carroll; an Illustrated Biography’, Constable, London 1976)

In turn, Hudson appears to have felt secure in citing Tuckwell as an authority as it fits, in most respects with picture of Carroll drawn by his nephew, Stuart Dodgson Collingwood, Carroll’s first biography. Both Carroll’s ‘conservatism’ and his political adherence to ‘Conservative’ politics is a constant theme of Collingwood’s biography:

"But in 1861 (Lewis Carroll) was anything but universally popular, and I am afraid that Mr Dodgson, nothing if not a stauch Conservative sided with the majority against (Benjamin Jowett)." (S, Dodgson Collingwood, Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll, Fisher Unwin, London, 1898 [2nd edition, 1899])

The issue to which Collingwood is referring is the matter of the Greek Professorship and Mr Jowett’s salary. The Post of Greek Professor was an endowed position that had, for many years attracted a salary of £40:00 per annum. By 1861, this had become a derisory sum of money for such a prestigious post. A proposal to increase the sum was therefore put forward. Unfortunately, Dr Jowett’s contribution to ‘Essays and Reviews’ had attracted a great deal of ire from an influential group within Oxford. Led by the redoubtable and extremely ‘High Church’ Edward Bouverie Pusey (Then, the lading Tractarian) a strong opposition to the proposal was mounted.

Carroll made a brief reference to the debate in an 1861 diary entry:

November 20th: Promulgation, in Congregation, of the new statute to endow Jowett. The speaking took up the whole afternoon, and the two points at issue, the endowing a Regius Professorship, and the countenancing Jowett’s theological opinions, got so inextricably mixed up that I rose to beg that they might be kept separate. Once on my feet, I said more than I at first meant, and defied them ever to tire out the opposition by perpetually bringing the question on (Mem.: If I ever speak again I will try to say no more than I had resolved before rising). This was my first speech in Congregation.

Both Collingwood and later, Hudson cite this intervention as ‘evidence’ that Carroll was supporting Pusey in the debate. Even Morton Cohen, in his 1995 ‘Lewis Carroll, a Biography’, status unequivocally that: ‘Charles opposed Jowett’s cause…’. However, given that it was Pusey who was deliberately ‘inextricably’ doing the mixing up, it is hard to reconcile Collingwood and later, Hudson and Cohen’s interpretation with what Carroll actually says.

This contretemps took place in 1861. However, the issue of the salary of the Regus Professor of Greek refused to lie down. So long as Jowett held the Chair, there remained those determined to use this issue to punish him for his unorthodox views. Pusey first sought to have Jowett’s salary charged to the University rather than to the revenues of Christ Church College. A Christian College should not be expected to support a heretical teacher. However, the Hebdominal Council refused to countenance this proposal. The issue was returned to Convocation for resolution.

In 1865 the issue was finally resolved. An award, not of the original £400:00, but a challenging £500:00 was voted — unfortunately not before a great deal of religious and secular blood had flowed through Oxford’s halls and corridors. This gave Lewis Carroll another, and more considered opportunity to enter the fray.

Tufail, John. “Understanding Carroll’s Theological and Philosophical Views.” Contrariwise: the Association for New Lewis Carroll Studies. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 July 2014. <http://contrariwise.wild-reality.net/articles/Understanding%20Carroll’s%20Philosophy.pdf>

Been finding books of the Italian Alice on Ebay. The cover on the right seems to be rarer than the striped covers. If anyone could gets these, please share the scans!

orpheus-mnemosyne:

Today I found an old photograph of my mother when she was really young. Please correct me if I’m wrong, but I doesn’t she look exactly like Ina Liddell??What do you think still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise?

Yeah, I can see it too! And very nice edit!

orpheus-mnemosyne:

Today I found an old photograph of my mother when she was really young. Please correct me if I’m wrong, but I doesn’t she look exactly like Ina Liddell??

What do you think still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise?

Yeah, I can see it too! And very nice edit!

draelogor:

fairytalesfor20somethings:

Alice’s friends were probably out at the movies or going on dates, but she had much more exciting plans for her Friday night: Waste hours in Tumblr-land.

still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise

This depicts me too well. Thanks for tagging me &lt;3

draelogor:

fairytalesfor20somethings:

Alice’s friends were probably out at the movies or going on dates, but she had much more exciting plans for her Friday night: Waste hours in Tumblr-land.

still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise

This depicts me too well. Thanks for tagging me <3

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