Phantomwise [Down the Rabbit-Hole]

A blog dedicated to Alice in Wonderland, its many interpretations, and the man who imagined it all (as well as his other works).

For my personal preference, I don't blog the Burton film or 'darker' Alices.
This blog supports the new research by Karoline Leach and Contrariwise.

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We are but older children, dear,
Who fret to find our bedtime near

Lewis Carroll (via neverfadingleaves)

and the happy summer days…

Christ Church, Oxford
October 21, 1876

Dear Mrs. Chataway,

I am charmed to hear you can come. Thursday will do well. If you could come on Wednesday afternoon, it would be ten times better, and the only additional expense would be beds—not many shillings. I would engage your beds at lodgings opposite, where my sisters lodge when they visit me, and you would live over here, only sleeping there. Would you want one room or two? By coming on Wednesday we could begin the photos at 9 on Thursday: morning light is much the best — and I would ask Mr. Sampson to come and dine with us on Wednesday. (Excuse a rambling style: I write amid interruptions of pupils.)

A question now arises, which I would be glad if you and Mr. Chataway would settle at once. I have a little friend here, Lily Gray, child of Dr. Gray, and one of my chief beach friends at Sandown this year. She is 5, a graceful and pretty child, and one of the sweetest children I know (nearly as sweet as Gertrude) — and she is so perfectly simple and unconscious that it is a matter of entire indifference to her whether she is taken in full dress or nothing. My question is, are you going to allow Gertrude (who I think is also perfectly simple and unconscious) to be done in the same way? If so, I could make such lovely groups of the two (e.g. Lily sitting on Gertrude’s knee), and I would ask Mrs. Gray to bring Lily over on Thursday morning. Of course if you or she would not like it, I withdraw my request: but I would like to know beforehand, that I may arrange with Mrs. Gray. I did a very successful one of Lily, so dressed, yesterday.

Gertrude need not bring spade or bucket: I have both here.

Very sincerely yours,
C.L. Dodgson

Lewis Carroll’s letter to Mrs. J. Chataway.

Cohen, Morton. The Letters of Lewis Carroll. 2 volumes. New York: Oxford University, 1979. 259-60. Print.

Crocodiles in Cream - a portrait of Lewis Carroll

Kevin Moore submitted:

I’m getting this show up on it’s feet again for the 2015 Celebrations.

Please have a look at the website www.crocodilesincream.com for more information. Will let you know when I have confimed bookings and would be grateful if you could include me in your events.

Kind regards,

Kevin Moore

While I post about Alice 150 and am planning to attend, I’m not behind it. If you’re doing it in the US, then Joel Birenbaum is the guy to contact to become listed. If you’re doing it in the UK, I believe he’s making a list of worldwide events, but if he’s not, he can probably tell you who to talk to.

I explored your website a bit anyway and you are obviously a talented actor. Honestly, from the reviews, I can’t say I feel comfortable with how Dodgson is portrayed. Also, I notice in your trailer, you quote Dodgson’s reply to his sister when she wrote to him about having ‘girl-guests.’ I hope it’s not being quoted out of context! The letter was about unmarried, young women visiting him. In example, the two girls mentioned in that letter, Gertrude Chataway and Edith Miller, were in their twenties at the time. I think some people misunderstand as it mentions their parents, but women then stayed home and continued obeying their parents until they married.

Regardless, the other video clips were well done and funny, I particularly liked the Clock Lecture and Oxford Life.

leonard-loves-disney:

Alice is too dang cute!

leonard-loves-disney:

Alice is too dang cute!

Part of the Carrollian Coloring Challenge; illustration by Lea Kaster

Part of the Carrollian Coloring Challenge; illustration by Lea Kaster

My Alice in Wonderland book collection

the-mad-tea-party submitted:

Hey there,

I opened a little site that catalogs my Alice book collection… Thought you might be interested…it’s at  The Cheshire Cat.

You can see the different categories under the Alice in Wonderland section. 

Please feel free to give any feedback either here or in the About section on the site…I would really appreciate it.

I will be updating it every couple of weeks or so, depends on my purchases…

Thanks and keep up the amazing work on your blog!

Maayan

What an amazing collection! Thanks for sharing. You have a lot of interesting books that I haven’t seen before. The only feedback I have is that I’d love to see a couple more pictures of the insides, especially of the Hebrew books.


"I beg your pardon for keeping you waiting!” [Mein Herr] said. “I was just making sure that I knew the English for all the words. I am quite ready now.” And he read me the following Legend:—
"In a city that stands in the very centre of Africa, and is rarely visited by the casual tourist, the people had always bought eggs—a daily necessary in a climate where egg-flip was the usual diet—from a Merchant who came to their gates once a week. And the people always bid wildly against each other: so there was quite a lively auction every time the Merchant came, and the last egg in his basket used to fetch the value of two or three camels, or thereabouts. And eggs got dearer every week. And still they drank their egg-flip, and wondered where all their money went to.
"And there came a day when they put their heads together. And they understood what donkeys they had been.
"And next day, when the Merchant came, only one man went forth. And he said ‘Oh, thou of the hook-nose and the goggle-eyes, thou of the measureless beard, how many for that lot of eggs?’
"And the Merchant answered him ‘I could let thee have that lot at ten thousand piastres the dozen.’
"And the Man chuckled inwardly, and said ‘Ten piastres the dozen I offer thee, and no more, oh descendant of a distinguished grandfather!’
"And the Merchant stroked his beard, and said ‘Hum! I will await the coming of thy friends.’ So he waited. And the Man waited with him. And they waited both together."
"The manuscript breaks off here," said Mein Herr, as he rolled it up again; "But it was enough to open our eyes…"

Lewis Carroll’s Sylvie and Bruno Concluded, illustrated by Harry Furniss

"I beg your pardon for keeping you waiting!” [Mein Herr] said. “I was just making sure that I knew the English for all the words. I am quite ready now.” And he read me the following Legend:—

"In a city that stands in the very centre of Africa, and is rarely visited by the casual tourist, the people had always bought eggs—a daily necessary in a climate where egg-flip was the usual diet—from a Merchant who came to their gates once a week. And the people always bid wildly against each other: so there was quite a lively auction every time the Merchant came, and the last egg in his basket used to fetch the value of two or three camels, or thereabouts. And eggs got dearer every week. And still they drank their egg-flip, and wondered where all their money went to.

"And there came a day when they put their heads together. And they understood what donkeys they had been.

"And next day, when the Merchant came, only one man went forth. And he said ‘Oh, thou of the hook-nose and the goggle-eyes, thou of the measureless beard, how many for that lot of eggs?’

"And the Merchant answered him ‘I could let thee have that lot at ten thousand piastres the dozen.’

"And the Man chuckled inwardly, and said ‘Ten piastres the dozen I offer thee, and no more, oh descendant of a distinguished grandfather!’

"And the Merchant stroked his beard, and said ‘Hum! I will await the coming of thy friends.’ So he waited. And the Man waited with him. And they waited both together."

"The manuscript breaks off here," said Mein Herr, as he rolled it up again; "But it was enough to open our eyes…"

Lewis Carroll’s Sylvie and Bruno Concluded, illustrated by Harry Furniss

(Source: commons.wikimedia.org)

papswholenewworld:

stitchkingdom:

Alice in Wonderland Canvas Tote from Disney Store
Take along all your golden afternoon essentials in Alice’s durable zip-top canvas tote with plenty of room for everything from notions to necessities - and a bit of nonsense. Above all, pack your patience! 
Follow STITCHKINGDOM.TUMBLR.COM for daily updates of new Disney items from your favorite shopping destinations!

@still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise, themadkiwi

I have a mighty need!! And glad to see it’s not in that weird black themeThanks for tagging me, Pap :)

papswholenewworld:

stitchkingdom:

Alice in Wonderland Canvas Tote from Disney Store

Take along all your golden afternoon essentials in Alice’s durable zip-top canvas tote with plenty of room for everything from notions to necessities - and a bit of nonsense. Above all, pack your patience! 

Follow STITCHKINGDOM.TUMBLR.COM for daily updates of new Disney items from your favorite shopping destinations!

@still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise, themadkiwi

I have a mighty need!! And glad to see it’s not in that weird black theme
Thanks for tagging me, Pap :)

pankurios-templeovarts:

Pics of the Alice In Wonderland series taken by Vladimir Clavijo.

May Robson as the Queen of Hearts, Charlotte Henry as Alice, and Alison Skipworth as the Duchess in a promotional image for Alice in Wonderland (1933). Thanks to ebay seller ski-vt.

May Robson as the Queen of Hearts, Charlotte Henry as Alice, and Alison Skipworth as the Duchess in a promotional image for Alice in Wonderland (1933). Thanks to ebay seller ski-vt.

The same Sotheby’s catalogue entry quotes Cohen’s biography in order to offer an apparently damning example of Carroll’s peculiarities over children:

The month before this letter (September 1893) Carroll had answered an enquiry from his sister, Mary, in which she raised the issue of his “unusual friendships.” He replied that “the only two tests I now apply…are, first my own conscience, to settle whether I feel it to be entirely innocent and right, i the sight of God; secondly the parents of my friend, to settle whether I have their full approval for what I do. (Morton N. Cohen, Lewis Carroll: a Biography, p. 189)

At first glance, this letter would seem to bear out the story told by Cohen’s biography: that Carroll’s sister, shocked at his inappropriate friendships with little girls, wrote to him in order to persuade him to give up this odd compulsion. But in reality the “child”-friends referred to in the letter were Gertrude Chataway, aged twenty-seven, and Edith Miller, aged twenty-three. Gertrude was at the time staying with Dodgson, unchaperoned, in his seaside lodgings in Eastbourne, and Edith was a local girl, a close friend of his and frequent visitor. Not for the first or last time, gossip about these highly unconventional relationships of his had become so virulent that it reached the ears of his sister Mary in Sunderland. Her letter and his reply deal, not with her disquiet over his associating with children (as indeed few Victorians would have had any disquiet about that), but his potentially scandalous relationships with wholly adult women. The interpretation placed on the letter by Cohen is in fact the entire opposite of the truth. Two years before, in September, he had reported triumphantly to Ina Skene (nee Liddell):

Mr. Toole’s company was on tour at Eastbourne…and his ‘leading lady’ was staying with me! Please don’t be more shocked than is abosutely necessary. (Irene Vanbrugh, the leading lady referred to, was nineteen at the time.)

And a year later he took Beatrice Hatch, aged twenty-eight, to stay with him at Eastbourne, and wrote to Edith (September 1894):

Please remember that, so long as Beatrice is here, it will be strictly proper for either of you to call, even alone….And even after she has left, need you be supposed to know it, for a week or so? Your sexagenarian lover, C.L.D.”

On November 16, 1896, Dodgson wrote some potentially revealing words to Rachel Poole, one of his married women-friends:

Child-society is very delightful to me: but I confess that grown-up society is much more interesting!

He tended, it is true, to be a little inconsistent in his autobiography. “My views about children are changing: I now put the nicest age at about seventeen”, he wrote to Alexander Macmillan in 1877, while in 1894 he wrote to Mrs Caroline Egerton, “Twenty or thirty years ago, ‘ten’ was about my ideal age for [girl-]friends: now ‘twenty’ or ‘twenty-five’ is nearer the mark.” But the consistent reality was that Lewis Carroll’s ‘child friends’ were never the uniform collection of ‘little girls we now assume them to have been. For the past century, his biographers have largely ignored these declarations, in favour of a preoccupation with Carroll and little girls; and the popular view has followed theirs. Yet this familiar, disturbing picture of Carroll’s exclusive attachment to pre-pubescent females is flatly contradicted by the evidence of his letters and the nine volumes of his private diaries…”

Yet another example of Cohen purposefully misinterpreting evidence. We cannot trust his assertions.

Also note that he’s more affectionate and playful in tone in the letter to Ina than in his surviving letters to Alice. “Sexagenarian” means “a person who is from 60 to 69 years old.”

Leach, Karoline. “Lewis Carroll’s friendships with adult women.” Contrariwise: the Association for New Lewis Carroll Studies. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 September 2014. <http://contrariwise.wild-reality.net/articles/Love%20As%20Nonsense2.pdf>

Promotional photo of Kathryn Beaumont with Bernard Saruch that I hadn&#8217;t seen before. Being sold by ebay seller blueknight_44202.

Promotional photo of Kathryn Beaumont with Bernard Saruch that I hadn’t seen before. Being sold by ebay seller blueknight_44202.

Christ Church, Oxford
October 20, 1876

My dear Gertrude,

I have begun photographing again, and this afternoon, though it was very dull, I got some very good pictures of a little friend here, Lily Gray. So now I want another little friend to come and be done: do ask your Mother, or else your Father, to bring you over. Any Tuesday, or Thursday, or Saturday, I would manage to have a clear hour or two in the morning, which is the best time for photographing. You had better bring the blue jersery and the bathing-drawers with you. I shall want to take 8 pictures of you, so I send you 8 kisses, and remain

Your loving friend,
C.L. Dodgson

Lewis Carroll’s letter to Gertrude Chataway (aged 10).

Cohen, Morton. The Letters of Lewis Carroll. 2 volumes. New York: Oxford University, 1979. 259. Print.

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