Phantomwise [Down the Rabbit-Hole]

A blog dedicated to Alice in Wonderland, its many interpretations, and the man who imagined it all (as well as his other works).

For my personal preference, I don't blog the Burton film or 'darker' Alices.
This blog supports the new research by Karoline Leach and Contrariwise.

which way?
FAQ Adaptations Carrollian Tag Carroll Myth Archive Credits

BBC’s Alice Through the Looking Glass (1973) in higher resolution and in one part. I ripped it from my DVD, but Curiouser and Curiosuer taught me how to make better rips and uploaded it on Youtube. Make sure to subscribe!

sans-soleil:

Alice (dir. Jan Švankmajer — 1988)

Bust of Robert Hussey by Alexander Munro (March 1858)Taken by Charles Dodgson a.k.a. Lewis Carroll
Courtesy of Lewis Carroll, Photographer

Bust of Robert Hussey by Alexander Munro (March 1858)
Taken by Charles Dodgson a.k.a. Lewis Carroll

Courtesy of Lewis Carroll, Photographer

(Source: still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise)

When the last lady had disappeared…the pompous man gave a deep sigh of relief, filled his glass to the brim, pushed on the wine, and began one of his favorite orations. “They are charming, no doubt! Charming, but very frivolous. They drag us down, so to speak, to a lower level. They——”

"Do not all pronouns require antecedent nouns?" the Early gently enquired.

"Pardon me," said the pompous man, with lofty condescension. "I had overlooked the noun. The ladies. We regret their absence. Yet we console ourselves. Thought is free. With the, we are limited to trivial topics—Art, Literature, Politics, and so forth. One can bear to discuss such paltry matters with a lady. But no mn, in his senses—” (he looked sternly round the table, as if defying contradiction) “—ever yet discussed WINE with a lady!” He sipped his glass of port, leaned back in his chair, and slowly raised it up to his eye, so as to look through it at the lamp. “The vintage, my Lord?” he enquired, glancing at his host.

The Earl named the date.

"So I had supposed. But one likes to be certain. The tint is, perhaps, slightly pale. But the body is unquestionable. And as for the bouquet——”

Ah, that magic Bouqet! How vividly that singly word recalled the scene! The little beggar-boy turning his somersault in the road—the sweet little crippled maiden in my arms—the mysterious evanescent nursemaid—all rushed tumultuously into my mind, like the creatures of a dream: and through this mental haze there still boomed on, like the tolling of a bell, the solemn voice of the great connoisseur of WINE!

Even his utterances had taken on themselves a strange and dream-like form…”No,” he resumed: “there’s nothing like cherry-jam, after all. That’s what I say!”

"Not for all qualities!” an eager little man shrilly interposed. “For richness of general tone I don’t say that it has a rival. But for delicacy of modulation—for what one may call the ‘harmonics' of flavour—give me good old raspberry-jam!”

"Allow me one word!" The fat red-faced man, quite hoarse with excitement, broke into the dialogue. "It’s too important a question to be settled by Amateurs! I can give you the views of a Professional—perhaps the most experienced jam-taster now living. Why, I’ve known him fix the age of strawberry-jam, to a day—and we all know what a difficult jam it is to give a date to—on a single tasting! Well, I put to him the very question you are discussing. His words were ‘cherry-jam is best, for mere chiaroscuro of flavour: raspberry-jam lends itself best to those resolved discords that linger so lovingly on the tongue: but, for rapturous utterness of saccharine perfection, it’s apricot-jam first and the rest nowhere!' That was well put, wasn’t it?”

"Consummately put!" shrieked the eager little man.

"I know your friend well," said the pompous man. "As a jam-taster, he has no rival! Yet I scarcely think——-"

But here the discussion became general: and his words were lost in a confused medley of names, every guest sounding the praises of his own favorite jam. At length, through the din, our host’s voice made itself heard. “Let us join the ladies!” These words seemed to recall me to waking life; and I felt sure that, for the last few minutes, I had relapsed into the ‘eerie’ state.

"A strange dream!" I said to myself as we trooped upstairs. "Grown men discussing, as seriously as if they were matters of life and death, the hopelessly trivial details of mere delicacies that appeal to no higher human function than the nerves of the tongue and palate! What a humiliating spectacle such a discussion would be in waking life!”

I feel it may be obvious, but in case it isn’t, Carroll is making fun of the men who say women “drag” their conversation to a lower level when they merely talk about wine. To emphasize the ridiculousness, he replaces the wine with jam.

Lewis Carroll’s Sylvie and Bruno Concluded

THE OZIAN TAG

oz-some:

image

The Wizard of Oz tag is a mess.

The same introduction sentence was posted by the awesome phantomwise in 2011 regarding the Alice in Wonderland tag. Since I personally think that there’s no difference with the Oz tag, I really hope that I can start this and I need you guys to help me. I really miss how you can’t use tumblr for finding the really dedicated people, the collectors, the editors and especially news, information and archive material.

Basically the same rules apply to this tag:

1.The tag should be used for anything Oz related.
It doesn’t matter if you want to post a gifset from the 1939 film or a picture from the original Denslow artwork.

2. Do not spam!
Please don’t post something that doesn’t belong the Oz universe, especially not just because you do a tiny reference in an otherwise unrelated post.

3. Respect and tolerance
This tag was my idea to bring more people together. Don’t be rude or intolerant and respect opinions.

Anyone can use this and everyone who blogs about Oz should use it!

I know lots of you guys are Oz fans! If we got ‘Carrollian’ to catch on, we can get ‘Ozian’ too as well.

Child’s Lit fandoms got to stick together.

polinakniazeva:

The glass table

polinakniazeva:

The glass table

Charlotte Henry as Alice and Edna May Oliver as the Red Queen from Alice in Wonderland (1933). Thanks to ebay seller ski-vt.

Charlotte Henry as Alice and Edna May Oliver as the Red Queen from Alice in Wonderland (1933). Thanks to ebay seller ski-vt.

The paper is written on two sides in several different hands. It has obviously been referred to and updated by the Dodgsons over a period of some twenty years at least. One side is full of biographical notes about the Liddell daughters and Alice’s descendants. The other is headed ‘Cut Pages in Diary’ and contains summaries of the contents of three pages, two from Volume Eight and one from Volume Eleven. The second summary from Volume Eight is of the missing page. June 27-29, 1863. It reads:

'L.C. learns from Mrs Liddell that he is supposed to be using the children as a means of paying court to the governess — he is also supposed [unreadable] to be courting Ina'.

The handwriting appears to be that of Violet Dodgson, who was co-guardian of the diaries with her sister Menella from the early 1940s to the late 1960s. The unreadable portion may possibly say ‘by some’. That this summary is not a guess about an already missing page is indicated by the fact that the first of the pages listed is still in the diary. In other words the notes were made before the pages were removed. Violet must have gone through the diary noting the pages to be cut and summarising their most important contents. Later she changed her mind about one and allowed it to remain. The above, then, is the only known account of what happened between June 27 and 29, 1863. What does it mean?

We can assume that as a result of Dodgson’s letter to Mrs Liddell on June 27 she either wrote to him or asked him to the Deanery. In either case she told him there were rumours circulating about him and ‘the governess’ and ‘Ina’. As a result he was either told to stay away, or they agreed that it would be safest for him to do so for a while. No mention of Alice, nothing to suggest the business had anything to do with her at all.

The governess was Miss Prickett, an unprepossessing female employed by the Liddells to educate their daughters. There had been vague gossip circulating about her and Dodgson back in 1857. He recorded it himself in his diary at the time, (May 17) with some astonishment, adding that he wasn’t bothered by ‘so groundless a rumour’. The governess we can probably dismiss as old news, unlikely to trouble the proud Mrs Liddell. The significant individual is ‘Ina’.

Ina was Alice’s older sister, Lorina Charlotte Liddell. In June 1863 she was fourteen years old and highly developed for her age; a young woman, not a child. By that summer she had already been allowed into Dodgson’s company for a good deal longer than Victorian convention would have considered proper. He was young, handsome and unmarried. She was tall and strikingly attractive. Girls were legally marriageable at twelve. By thirteen she would have been considered to have left her childhood behind. Yet this bright, ‘imperious’ creature was still accompanying her younger sisters on long unchaperoned river trips with the thirty-one-year-old Mr Dodgson throughout her fourteenth summer and beyond.

She is mentioned in his journal at this time in ways that set her apart from Alice or Edith and may be significant. On August 6 1862 Dodgson observes that Ina will probably not be allowed to go out with him and her sisters for much longer, noting that the day’s excursion was ‘her fourteenth time’. It is Ina who invites him to visit at her grandparents’ house in April 1863, Ina again who writes and asks him to come and help out at a charity bazaar where she and her sisters are running a stall. On April 17 1863 Dodgson comments on her precocious development (she is growing ‘so tall’), and notes for the first time that Mrs Liddell has insisted on a chaperon. Is this a sign that the mother was becoming suspicious of the exact nature of the relationship between this man and her daughter? Did she watch them together a few weeks later, during the happy outing of June 15, and draw her own conclusions? Is this why, two or three days afterwards, she warned him off?

Personally, I don’t think Mrs Liddell suspected anything between Ina and Dodgson. She hadn’t minded the rumors before when it just concerned Miss Prickett, but when it included her then-adult daughter, she had to put her foot down.

Leach, Karoline. “Ina in Wonderland.” Contrariwise: the Association for New Lewis Carroll Studies. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 July 2014. <http://contrariwise.wild-reality.net/articles/INA%20IN%20WONDERLAND.pdf>

What is the Carroll Myth? Why are some of his diaries missing? What’s on the missing pages?

Carroll had a strong friendship with the Liddells since he met them in 1856 and saw the children almost constantly. He almost seemed apart of the family until June 1863 when he suddenly stopped seeing the Liddells. What happened in 1863?

The most popular theory was that Carroll was in love with Alice, despite the large age gap, and proposed marriage, and the family cut ties with him in response. This gets repeated so often that it gets misstated as ‘truth’, when existing evidence proves otherwise.

After Carroll’s death in 1898, the Dodgson family released one biography (by his nephew Stuart Collingwood Dodgson) and then sealed Carroll’s diaries and other properties from the public and future biographers. This was, understandably, suspicious behavior and people wondered: was there something they were trying to hide? and did it involve Alice Liddell? By 1932, when interest sparked in Carroll because of the centenary of his birth, it was revealed that 4 volumes out of the total 13 diary volumes were lost. They said they were regrettably misplaced; no one questioned this explanation. In 1953, the family finally allowed a biographer, Roger Lancelyn Green, access and permission to publish them in “The Diaries of Lewis Carroll”. Green stated that nothing had been left out, but this was far from the truth. In actuality, he was not allowed to view the diaries and worked from a typescript prepared by Carroll’s nieces, which omitted 50% of the complete diaries. What did they leave out? Anything that they felt, to their Victorian sensitivities, portrayed their uncle in a negative light. Such as inappropriate meetings with unmarried ladies, meetings with people they thought controversial; even plays he attended or artwork he admired were edited out (many of these art pieces depicting nude women). Green probably did not notice, after all — this edited version supported his viewpoint of an ‘innocent’ dreamer-of-children Carroll. 

It was believed that once the full diaries were published, it would contain the answer. In 1969, after Carroll’s nieces, the gate-keepers of his remaining possessions, died, the Dodgson family sold the seven diary volumes to the public. The diaries simply did not contain what most were expecting. There were no confessions of love to Alice and she was barely mentioned specifically from her sisters. The diaries instead brought up more questions. Seven pages were deliberately cut. Why? and by who? One of these cut pages, suspiciously, covered June 27-29, 1863, when his friendship with the Liddells suffered the sudden break.

This cut page became the center of a new theory, that it had mentioned his proposal to Alice and its rejection (even though Alice was hardly mentioned at all in the rest of the diaries), and must have been cut out because of this. In the 1990’s while conducting research in the Dodgson archive, Karoline Leach came across something that had been overlooked: the ‘cut pages in diary’ document. It is a paper written on both sides in different hands, most likely the Dodgsons kept it as reference. On the front page, in Violet Dodgson’s hand (one of the nieces), bluntly labeled “cut pages in diary” like a to-do list, detailing three pages (two that were cut, one was instead inked over). This is what is says for 27-29 June, 1863:

L.C. learns from Mrs. Liddell that he is supposed to be using the children to court the governess — He is also supposed [unreadable] to be courting Ina.
[Ina was, at that time, entering marriageable age; mostly likely he had agreed with Mrs. Liddell to discourage the rumors to protect their reputations. And, what people often forget is that he did resume his friendship with them later, though not as strongly.]

Nothing about Alice at all.

This simple paper has started new research, inspiring scholars to turn to primary evidence and tracing repeated myths to find that they have no biographical evidence at all. You’d be surprised at just how much of what you think you know about this man is untrue. And why did this happen? There was something about Carroll that did not fit the image of ‘child patron saint’ that had become so popular after his death and his family, thinking they were protecting him, went to far lengths to hide it. Of course, theories get thrown about about why they were holding back and somewhere along the road, someone states it as fact instead of theory. Others, thinking it is fact, add on their suspicions which turn into fact as well. It’s an unstoppable avalanche and the family could have never imagined what their secrecy led to.

Leach termed all of this as ‘the Carroll Myth’. New researchers, such as Leach herself or Jenny Woolf have proposed their own theories, based on primary evidence, as to what the family was so desperate to hide. But, they agree on one thing: Alice was not as special as people think and Carroll was not in love with her.

thedisneyseries:

Alice and Wendy @ princess dining,
for roseofrapunzel

thedisneyseries:

Alice and Wendy @ princess dining,

for

(Source: still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise)

The Chestnuts, Guildford
January 15, 1876

My dear Holliday,

I finished off my letter at Brighton yesterday in a hurry, and omitted to say how pleased I am with the proofs you sent me. They seem to me most successfully cut, and I agree with you in thinking the head of “Hope” a great success; it is quite lovely.

On my return here last night, I found the charming chess-board, for which accept my best thanks. My sister and I have played several games of “Go-bang” on them already. (I need hardly remark that they serve just as well for that, or for draughts, as they do for chess.)

Now for another bit of designing, if you don’t mind undertaking it. Macmillan writes me word that the gorgeous cover will cost 1s. 4d. a copy! Whereas we can’t really afford more than 3s. for the book. My idea is this, to have a simpler cover for the 3s/ copies, which will, no doubt, be the ones usually sold, but to offer the gorgeous covers at 4s., which will be bought by the rich and those who wish to give them as presents. What I want you to do is to take Alice as a guide, and design covers requiring about the same amount of gold, or better, a little less. As Alice and Looking-Glass have both got grotesque faces outside, I should like these to be pretty, as a contrast, and I don’t think we can do better than to take the head of “Hope” for the first side, and “Care” for the second, and, as these are associated with “forks” and “thimbles” in the poem, what do you think of surrounding them, one with a border of interlaced forks, the other with a shower of thimbles? And what do you think of putting a bell at each corner of the cover, instead of a single line? The only thing to secure is that the total amount of gold required shall be less than on the cover of Alice.

All these are merely suggestions: you will be a far better judge of the matter than I can be, and perhaps may think of some quite different, and better, design.

Yours very truly,
C.L. Dodgson

Lewis Carroll’s letter to Henry Holliday, illustrator of The Hunting of the Snark.

Cohen, Morton. The Letters of Lewis Carroll. 2 volumes. New York: Oxford University, 1979. 238-9. Print.

Another rare 1915 book on ebay. This is actually quite a bit rarer than others I&#8217;ve seen. It has the color picture on the cover but the cloth is blue rather than tan and with red lettering than green. Auction starts at $29.99.
I don&#8217;t think the seller&#8217;s aware of what they have. I have no idea what it&#8217;ll go for total. It doesn&#8217;t look like it&#8217;s in excellent condition, but it is even more rare than the others I&#8217;ve seen. Happy bidding!

Another rare 1915 book on ebay. This is actually quite a bit rarer than others I’ve seen. It has the color picture on the cover but the cloth is blue rather than tan and with red lettering than green. Auction starts at $29.99.

I don’t think the seller’s aware of what they have. I have no idea what it’ll go for total. It doesn’t look like it’s in excellent condition, but it is even more rare than the others I’ve seen. Happy bidding!

I apologize. I kept forgetting to post this. This is what my friend Curiouser and Curiouser/someperson42 found out about &#8220;A Dream of Alice.&#8221; He was able to confirm that it was an actual program, but honestly, we&#8217;re even more confused on what it was. We&#8217;d like to see that 27 March 1982 edition of the Radio Times which had a 3 page feature on it, but he couldn&#8217;t find it online. Can someone in the UK do some searching around?

A Dream of Alice: Husband and wife Laurie Holloway and Marian Montgomery put together a Lewis Carroll anthology for last year&#8217;s Warrington Festival. Now it is transferred to television., with the additon of sketches by Keith Michell and extra words from Benny Green. Famouse Carroll senes are performed by (among others) Miss Montgomery, Jenny Agutter, Michael Hordern, Nyree Dawn Porter and John Clive. (BBC 2, 9.50-10.35pm)

The Time Preview 26 March-April 1982

A posthumous birthday celebration, in honour of Lewis Carroll (born 150 years ago) and his eternal fantasy, &#8220;Alice&#8217;s Adventures in Wonderland&#8221; (born 1865). This jazzy musical reflection by Marian Montgomery and husband Laurie Holloway, comes to television with watercolours by actor Keith Michell (in the style of his Captain Beaky illustrations) and the rich voices of Miss Montgomery, Michael Hordern, Nyree Dawn Porter, Jenny Agutter, and John Clive.

The Times Monday March 29&#160;1982

First commissioned by the Warrington Festival to celebrate Lewis Carroll&#8217;s 150th anniversary, this programme of words and music created by Marian Montgomery &#8212; who presents it &#8212; and composer Laurie Holloway. The television version includes Jenny Agutter, Nyree Dawn Porter, Michael Hordern, John Clive, and illustrations by Keith Michell.

Television/Radio Monday March 29&#160;1982

I apologize. I kept forgetting to post this. This is what my friend Curiouser and Curiouser/someperson42 found out about “A Dream of Alice.” He was able to confirm that it was an actual program, but honestly, we’re even more confused on what it was. We’d like to see that 27 March 1982 edition of the Radio Times which had a 3 page feature on it, but he couldn’t find it online. Can someone in the UK do some searching around?

A Dream of Alice: Husband and wife Laurie Holloway and Marian Montgomery put together a Lewis Carroll anthology for last year’s Warrington Festival. Now it is transferred to television., with the additon of sketches by Keith Michell and extra words from Benny Green. Famouse Carroll senes are performed by (among others) Miss Montgomery, Jenny Agutter, Michael Hordern, Nyree Dawn Porter and John Clive. (BBC 2, 9.50-10.35pm)

The Time Preview 26 March-April 1982

A posthumous birthday celebration, in honour of Lewis Carroll (born 150 years ago) and his eternal fantasy, “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” (born 1865). This jazzy musical reflection by Marian Montgomery and husband Laurie Holloway, comes to television with watercolours by actor Keith Michell (in the style of his Captain Beaky illustrations) and the rich voices of Miss Montgomery, Michael Hordern, Nyree Dawn Porter, Jenny Agutter, and John Clive.

The Times Monday March 29 1982

First commissioned by the Warrington Festival to celebrate Lewis Carroll’s 150th anniversary, this programme of words and music created by Marian Montgomery — who presents it — and composer Laurie Holloway. The television version includes Jenny Agutter, Nyree Dawn Porter, Michael Hordern, John Clive, and illustrations by Keith Michell.

Television/Radio Monday March 29 1982

karlatg:

Meryl Streep | ‘Alice in Concert’ 1980.

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