Phantomwise [Down the Rabbit-Hole]

A blog dedicated to Alice in Wonderland, its many interpretations, and the man who imagined it all (as well as his other works).

For my personal preference, I don't blog the Burton film or 'darker' Alices.
This blog supports the new research by Karoline Leach and Contrariwise.

which way?
FAQ Adaptations Carrollian Tag Carroll Myth Archive Credits

haruchonns:

Alice’s adventures in Wonderland:Alice nel paese delle meraviglie
Italian version printed Spain 1991

illustration by Eric Kincaid

Seven Twyford Schoolboys (summer 1859)From left to right: James Hume Dodgson, Frederick George Richardson, A. Gordon. Edwin Dodgson, Charles Fosbery, John St. John Frederick, and Albert HeathcoteTaken by Charles Dodgson a.k.a. Lewis CarrollNote: Edwin Dodgson was his brother and James Hume Dodgson was their cousin.
Courtesy of Lewis Carroll, Photographer

Seven Twyford Schoolboys (summer 1859)
From left to right: James Hume Dodgson, Frederick George Richardson, A. Gordon. Edwin Dodgson, Charles Fosbery, John St. John Frederick, and Albert Heathcote
Taken by Charles Dodgson a.k.a. Lewis Carroll
Note: Edwin Dodgson was his brother and James Hume Dodgson was their cousin.

Courtesy of Lewis Carroll, Photographer

Mein Herr: “…Then came the wildest craze of all.”

"What, another craze?” I said.

"It’s the last one," said the old man. "…Each College wanted to get the clever boys: so we adopted a system which we had heard was very popular in England: the Colleges competed against each other, and the boys let themselves out to the highest bidder! What geese we were! Why, they bound to come to the University somehow. We needn’t have paid’em! And all our money went in getting clever boys to come to one College rather than another! The competition was so keen, that at least mere money-payments were not enough. Any College, that wished to secure some specially clever young man, had to waylay him at the Station, and hunt him through the streets. The first who touched him was allowed to have him.”

"That hunting-down of the scholars, as they arrived, must have been a curious business," I said. "Could you give me some idea of what it was like?"

"Willingly!" said the old man. "I will describe to you the very last Hunt that took place, before that form of Sport (for it was actually reckoned among the Sports of the day: we called it ‘Cub-Hunting’) was finally abandoned. I witnessed it myself, as I happened to be passing by at the moment, and was what we called ‘in the death.’ I can see it now!” he went on in an excited tone, gazing into vacancy with those large dreamy eyes of his…

Mein Herr: “The scene at the Railway-Station had been (so they told me) one of wild excitement. Eight or nine Heads of Colleges had assembled at the gates (no one was allowed inside), and the Station-Master had drawn a line on the pavement, and insisted on their all standing behind it. The gates were flung open! The young man darted through them, and feld like lightning down the street, while the Heads of Colleges actually yelled with excitement on catching sight of him! The Proctor gave the word in old statutory form, ‘Semel! Bis! Ter! Currite!’, and the Hunt began! Oh, it was a fine sight, believe me! At the first corner he dropped his Greek Lexicon: further on, his railway-rug: then various small articles: then his umbrella: lastly, what I suppose he prized most, his hand-bag: but the game was up: the spherical Principal of— of—”

"Of which College?” I said.

"—of one of the Colleges,” he resumed, “had put into operation the Theory—his own discovery—of Accelerated Velocity, and captured him just opposite to where I stood. I shall never forget that wild breathless struggle! But it was soon over. Once in those great bony hands, escape was impossible!”

Lewis Carroll’s Sylvie and Bruno Concluded, illustrated by Harry Furniss

(Source: commons.wikimedia.org)

the-grimpen-postmaster:

still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise:

the-grimpen-postmaster:

still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise:

Once the French 1949 is captioned, I’d like to put together a “complete” version of the film, but a better English version is necessary. So I’ve done some research on the runtimes of the English versions of the film.

According to Film Daily Yearbook 1952, the runtime on release was 83 minutes (which is longer than the French one at 71).

Here’s the listings on the VHS tapes and DVD runtimes:

The restored version at the Museum of Modern Art is at 96 minutes (perhaps including scenes from the French version). Strangely one person who saw this version says the film was limited to red and green colors (and says Alice wore a chartreuse and orange dress). I have no idea why that would be. If anybody reading this has seen that version, I’d be interested to know whether you agree and if you know why it’s that way.

I’m going to try to get my hands on the Apprehensive DVD and/or Kid Flicks VHS.

I think I know why the print in the Museum of Modern Art is exclusively red and green.

Early Technicolor (Phase II and Phase III, if you want to look it up) were filmed in a way differently than we would expect. There were two colored strips of film running through the camera: one red, and one green.* These strips would be overlaid, then technicians would preform manual color correction on things like skin-tone and shadows.

Therefore, my guess is that the print in the Museum of Modern Art is an unprocessed work print that, for whatever reason, was never color-corrected.

*It was a little more complex than that, depending on if they were using Phase II or Phase III. But that doesn’t really matter for our current purpose.

That does make sense! Though I have no idea why MoMA wouldn’t color-correct their restored version.

I really hope to see that version eventually. I hope it’d help me in putting together a compete version for the public.

In film circles (especially in restoration circles) there’s a dogma against altering the film. To a degree, I agree with them. But they will not colorize a film unless the director left written instructions to both colorize a film and how to colorize it.

This reached a head in the late 80s, early 90s when there were honest to God congressional hearings started by film buffs to stop Ted Turner and Hugh Hefner from colorizing old Universal and MGM films (ironically, even George Lucas spoke against them at these hearings). The film world has never forgotten that witch hunt, and tends to never, ever colorize as a result. Even when they have an unfinished red-green print that the director, certainly, would’ve wanted color corrected.

Alternatively, I wonder if their print is in too poor condition to copy. Then I understand their choices, since colorization has the ever so slight chance of ruining their treasure.

I had no idea that it was such a big deal!

From what I currently know about Lou Bunin (which admittedly isn’t much), I think he probably would have wanted it color-corrected. It’s very likely that their print is in poor condition since I read that a lot of copies of the film have aged badly.

Also, interestingly, I noticed that in the blog post, he hadn’t mentioned any of it being French too. If it’s entirely in English, it would be an extremely rare print, making it understandable that they wouldn’t want to chance ruining it.

fuckyeahdisneyfacecharacters:

Alice in Disneyland Tokyo

fuckyeahdisneyfacecharacters:

Alice in Disneyland Tokyo

the-grimpen-postmaster:

still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise:

Once the French 1949 is captioned, I’d like to put together a “complete” version of the film, but a better English version is necessary. So I’ve done some research on the runtimes of the English versions of the film.

According to Film Daily Yearbook 1952, the runtime on release was 83 minutes (which is longer than the French one at 71).

Here’s the listings on the VHS tapes and DVD runtimes:

The restored version at the Museum of Modern Art is at 96 minutes (perhaps including scenes from the French version). Strangely one person who saw this version says the film was limited to red and green colors (and says Alice wore a chartreuse and orange dress). I have no idea why that would be. If anybody reading this has seen that version, I’d be interested to know whether you agree and if you know why it’s that way.

I’m going to try to get my hands on the Apprehensive DVD and/or Kid Flicks VHS.

I think I know why the print in the Museum of Modern Art is exclusively red and green.

Early Technicolor (Phase II and Phase III, if you want to look it up) were filmed in a way differently than we would expect. There were two colored strips of film running through the camera: one red, and one green.* These strips would be overlaid, then technicians would preform manual color correction on things like skin-tone and shadows.

Therefore, my guess is that the print in the Museum of Modern Art is an unprocessed work print that, for whatever reason, was never color-corrected.

*It was a little more complex than that, depending on if they were using Phase II or Phase III. But that doesn’t really matter for our current purpose.

That does make sense! Though I have no idea why MoMA wouldn’t color-correct their restored version.

I really hope to see that version eventually. I hope it’d help me in putting together a compete version for the public.

Once the French 1949 is captioned, I’d like to put together a “complete” version of the film, but a better English version is necessary. So I’ve done some research on the runtimes of the English versions of the film.

According to Film Daily Yearbook 1952, the runtime on release was 83 minutes (which is longer than the French one at 71).

Here’s the listings on the VHS tapes and DVD runtimes:

The restored version at the Museum of Modern Art is at 96 minutes (perhaps including scenes from the French version). Strangely one person who saw this version saw this version says the film was limited to red and green colors (and says Alice wore a chartreuse and orange dress). I have no idea why that would be. If anybody reading this has seen that version, I’d be interested to know whether you agree and if you know why it’s that way.

I’m going to try to get my hands on the Apprehensive DVD and/or Kid Flicks VHS.

In exploring Carroll’s views on love, Ranson-Polizzotti has referenced Carroll’s satirical “Novelty and Romancement” (The Train, 1856). She recounts that the story’s protagonist, Stubbs, is “a young lover in love with love itself.” Interestingly, here we find, almost verbatim, a concept from de Rougemont. Clue #1. The story continues that Stubbs, walking down the street, sees a sign in a shop window that seems to read: “Simon Lubkin: Dealer in Romancement” …except that Stubbs hasn’t noticed the gap between the “N” and the “C” in the word, making the sign really read: “Simon Lubkin: Dealer in Roman Cement.” Ranson-Polizzotti correctly asserts that “Carroll had or was forming his views about the impossibilities of love long before he wrote the Alice books,” but she fails to identify the deeper significance of the story. Interestingly, she states that “it is hardly unusual for any fairytale to be dark, even grim” and then goes on to recount numerous Grimm Brothers’ fairy tales, coming precariously close to…but not quite apprehending…Carroll’s hidden allegory on love.

"As a mass phenomenon, romantic love is peculiar to the West. We are so accustomed to living with the beliefs and assumptions of romantic love that we think it is the only form "love" on which marriage or love relationships can be based. We think it is the only "true love." But there is much that we can learn from the East about this. In Eastern cultures, like those of India or Japan, we find that married couples love each other with great warmth, often with a stability and devotion that puts us to shame. But their love is not "romantic love" as we know it."

When a person is “in love with love,” they believe that they have uncovered the ultimate meaning of life, revealed in another human being. They feel completed and life seems whole. There is, however, an aspect to romantic love that becomes a cycle of illusion. de Rougemont went so far as to say, in his seminal work, that the lure of romantic love was the will to death and self-destruction, or Roman Cement…a view from which Carroll’s death, it represents the culmination of sentiments and arguments that were afoot among intellectual circles of Carroll’s time. Ranson-Polizzotti is correct in claiming that “Carroll has not followed the fairytale template.” His heroine, indeed, is no damsel in distress. But why? The archetypal helpless mistress, modeled after the Myth of the Handless Maiden, served to illustrate the perfunctory view of women in all of the predominant romantic literature of the nineteenth-century. Ranson-Polizzotti goes on to remark that “Carroll did not write in any savior, there is no Price Charming.” Clue #2. For, Prince Charming—the knight on the white horse-would be the standardized view of men in the romantic literature from the same period. By contrast, Carroll’s knight on a horse, rather than being a hero, is a bumbler, a fool. It could be suggested that he is Parsifal, which, by a strange turn of events, makes him-albeit circuitously-a hero, but this is the subject of another essay. For not, it suffices to say that the symbols of the Romantic Myth-the helpless maiden and the rescuing knight-are conspicuously missing in Carroll’s story.

Ackerman, Sherry L. “Love As Nonsense: a Counter-Point.” Contrariwise: the Association for New Lewis Carroll Studies. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 September 2014. <http://contrariwise.wild-reality.net/articles/Love%20As%20Nonsense2.pdf>

zzker:

caprette did this commission for me of the Cheshire Cat from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. I couldn’t be more happy with it. :3

zzker:

caprette did this commission for me of the Cheshire Cat from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. I couldn’t be more happy with it. :3

More cool 1985 photos in 2 lots (1, 2). Both are starting at $9.

Christ Church, Oxford
July 21, 1876

My dear Mrs. Chataway,

If you had been going to send Gertrude to the “Malt-House” I would actually have paid her the compliment of staying here a few days longer, to give an opportunity for Mrs. Martineau to do what she had kindly undertaken to try to manage — namely, to send, or bring, Violet and Gertrude over here for the day. But as there is no hope of that, I shall probably leave here next week and shall spend, I hope, 2 months at Sandown, with some of my sisters.

Of all my Sandown friends of last summer, only one set have found their way here to be photographed: Colonel Todd and his 2 daughters, aged 12 and 10, came from London for the day last Tuesday — and we had a morning of photography and an afternoon of sightseeing.

Another year I do hope you will find your way here with Gertrude — and that I may take a lot of photographs of her: though I fear you will then think her too tall for the very primitive costume in which I had hoped to take her this summer!

Sincerely hoping that the change of scene is doing something to heal the wound which your heavy loss must have given to you all, I remain

Very sincerely yours,
C.L. Dodgson

Lewis Carroll’s letter to Mrs. J. Chataway.

Cohen, Morton. The Letters of Lewis Carroll. 2 volumes. New York: Oxford University, 1979. 255-6. Print.

haruchonns:

Alice’s adventures in Wonderland:Alice nel paese delle meraviglie
Italian version printed Spain 1991


illustration by Eric Kincaid

Writing to Fiona Fullerton

still-she-haunts-me-phantomwise:

I asked her agent and got a reply which I’ll post here since I know some of you would like to write her too.

You need to send a letter to Fiona at the address below complete with anything you’d like her to sign and a stamped addressed envelope so she can get it back to you.
Fiona Fullerton
Jean Diamond’s office
Diamond Management
31 Percy Street
London
W1T 2DD

I forgot to add this on. If you’re in the US, there’s more difficulty in providing a stamped addressed envelope. From my Google searches, seems like finding British stamps is the best way to solve the problem, but I’d suggest consulting your local post office too


Visual Development from Alice in Wonderland by Mary Blair

Visual Development from Alice in Wonderland by Mary Blair

(Source: disneyconceptsandstuff)

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